Vol. 16 nº 1 - Jan/Feb/Mar de 2022
Original Article Páginas: 115 a 120

Introduction of Induction Heating is too late for older residents with difficulty in handling fire

Authors Yuriko Kato1, Jiro Oonuma1, Mayumi Suzuki1, Kenichi Meguro1,2,3

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keywords: Alzheimer Disease; Cognitive Dysfunction; Induction Heating; Burns.

ABSTRACT:
Handling errors with household flammables, for example pan burning, may result in serious accidents, which may be caused by decreased attention or executive function.
OBJECTIVE: The manuals by several cities simply suggest the use of induction heating (IH) cookers. However, it requires complicated operation of buttons. Furthermore, no previous studies have examined the difficulty of IH operation in older adults.
METHODS: We examined 166 residents aged 75+ years in Wakuya, consisting 66 Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) 0 (healthy), 79 CDR 0.5 (very mild dementia), and 21 CDR 1+ (dementia) participants. Based on fire accident, they were classified into “high-risk,” “low-risk,” and “safety” groups. They were asked to actually use an IH as an examination. The participants who passed all procedures were classified as “good users,” and the remaining who failed were classified as “poor users.” Their overall cognitive and executive functions were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Trail Making Test A and Digit Symbol (DS), respectively.
RESULTS: The proportions of “good users” in the CDR 0, CDR 0.5, and CDR 1+ groups were 7 (10.6%), 6 (7.3%), and 0 (0%), respectively. For the CDR 0 and CDR 0.5 group, the good users had higher scores on the MMSE and DS than do the poor users.
CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of IH is too late for “high-risk group.” Since the IH cooker requires complicated operation of buttons, they may be difficult for older residents to handle. Executive function may be examined for early detection of handling errors with household flammables.

 

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